the-long-stagnation (Link Bibliography)

“the-long-stagnation” links:

  1. https://www.lesswrong.com/posts/tjH8XPxAnr6JRbh7k/hard-takeoff

  2. 2012-broderick.pdf

  3. 2003-murray-humanaccomplishment.pdf: “Human Accomplishment”⁠, Charles Murray

  4. https://www.amazon.com/Great-Stagnation-America-Low-Hanging-Eventually/dp/0525952713/

  5. https://www.amazon.com/Collapse-Complex-Societies-Studies-Archaeology/dp/052138673X/

  6. http://www.nobelprize.org/nobel_prizes/lists/laureates_ages/chemistry_ages.html

  7. http://www.kellogg.northwestern.edu/faculty/jones-ben/htm/AgeDynamicsText.pdf

  8. http://researchnews.osu.edu/archive/nobelage.htm

  9. https://www.amazon.com/Age-Achievement-Harvey-C-Lehman/dp/B006K496LO/

  10. http://businessinnovation.berkeley.edu/WilliamsonSeminar/jones040507.pdf

  11. DNB-FAQ#aging

  12. https://www.lesswrong.com/posts/zRKW7LotZxJi6Cyeg/living-forever-is-hard-part-2-adult-longevity

  13. http://www.nber.org/papers/w11360.pdf

  14. http://citeseerx.ist.psu.edu/viewdoc/download?doi=10.1.1.174.2853&rep=rep1&type=pdf

  15. https://www.amazon.com/Time-Doctorate-Lengthening-Completion-Engineering/dp/030904085X/

  16. https://www.amazon.com/Trends-Early-Careers-Life-Scientists/dp/0309061806/

  17. https://www.amazon.com/Sociology-Science-Theoretical-Empirical-Investigations/dp/0226520927/

  18. https://www.amazon.com/Production-Distribution-Knowledge-United-States/dp/0691003564/

  19. http://pcdb.santafe.edu/index.php

  20. Culture-is-not-about-Esthetics#fn48

  21. https://www.newyorker.com/reporting/2012/01/30/120130fa_fact_lehrer?currentPage=all

  22. https://www.lesswrong.com/posts/qNxPRh5jzrLorak6B/prediction-is-hard-especially-of-medicine

  23. Modafinil

  24. http://pubs.acs.org/doi/abs/10.1021/jm200504p

  25. https://blogs.sciencemag.org/pipeline/archives/2011/09/13/fifty_years_of_medchem_molecules_what_are_they_telling_us

  26. http://www.wired.com/magazine/2011/12/ff_causation/all/1

  27. http://www.forbes.com/sites/matthewherper/2012/02/10/the-truly-staggering-cost-of-inventing-new-drugs/

  28. http://features.blogs.fortune.cnn.com/2011/07/28/pfizer-jeff-kindler-shakeup/

  29. https://online.wsj.com/article/SB10001424053111904265504576567070931547618.html

  30. http://dl.dropbox.com/u/85192141/2012-scannell.pdf

  31. http://pipeline.corante.com/archives/2012/03/08/erooms_law.php

  32. https://www.nature.com/articles/483531a

  33. https://nitter.hu/JustinWolfers/status/113614295635472385

  34. http://www.census.gov/newsroom/releases/archives/income_wealth/cb11-157.html

  35. https://innovationandgrowth.wordpress.com/2011/07/29/productivity-surge-of-2007-09-melts-away-in-new-data/

  36. https://kk.org/thetechnium/archives/2011/04/would_you_pay_f.php

  37. http://siepr.stanford.edu/system/files/shared/Final_Rosston_Savage_Waldman_02_04_10__1_.pdf

  38. http://www.mediacom.keio.ac.jp/publication/pdf2009/03_Masanori%20KONDO.pdf

  39. http://faculty.chicagobooth.edu/austan.goolsbee/research/timeuse.pdf

  40. https://www.bloomberg.com/news/2011-08-09/productivity-in-u-s-falls-for-second-straight-quarter-as-labor-costs-rise.html

  41. https://marginalrevolution.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/08/canada1.png

  42. http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/b/b8/Canadian_Oil_Production_1960_to_2020.png

  43. https://marginalrevolution.com/marginalrevolution/2011/08/is-there-a-productivity-crisis-in-canada.html

  44. http://www.theaustralian.com.au/business/economics/mining-drags-down-productivity/story-e6frg926-1226107755451

  45. https://www.amazon.com/Introduction-Economic-Growth-Second-Charles/dp/0393977455/

  46. http://jme.bmj.com/content/37/4/249.abstract?sid=905cb3bc-a961-4710-8544-5f0509a6b599

  47. http://pmretract.heroku.com/byyear

  48. http://3.bp.blogspot.com/-MyzK4IArktU/TVVkhe7bK6I/AAAAAAAACCQ/zDiehWXoCi4/s1600/tfp.jpg

  49. https://www.mckinseyquarterly.com/Marketing/Digital_Marketing/Measuring_the_value_of_search_2848

  50. http://www.cis.org/articles/2010/teen-study.pdf

  51. http://chronopause.com/chronopause.com/index.php/2011/08/20/interventive-gerontology-1-0-02-first-try-to-make-it-to-the-mean-diet-as-a-life-extending-tool-part-3/index.html

  52. http://politicalcalculations.blogspot.com/2011/07/how-much-are-geezers-displacing-teens.html

  53. http://politicalcalculations.blogspot.com/2011/07/disappearing-teen-jobs-and-minimum-wage_14.html

  54. http://www.ifw-members.ifw-kiel.de/publications/a-simple-decomposition-of-the-variance-of-output-growth-across-countries-1/KWP%201703.pdf

  55. https://marginalrevolution.com/marginalrevolution/2011/08/where-does-the-japanese-slowdown-come-from.html#comment-body-157487734

  56. https://marginalrevolution.com/marginalrevolution/2011/08/where-does-the-japanese-slowdown-come-from.html#comment-157487642

  57. https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0014498311000416

  58. http://www.zerohedge.com/news/wikileaks-cable-reveals-chinese-warning-domestic-asset-bubbles-overcapacity-early-2010-bashing-

  59. ⁠, Zhenglun Pan, Thomas A. Trikalinos, Fotini K. Kavvoura, Joseph Lau, John P. A. Ioannidis (2005-08-15):

    Background: Postulated epidemiological associations are subject to several biases. We evaluated whether the Chinese literature on human genome epidemiology may offer insights on the operation of selective reporting and language biases.

    Methods and Findings: We targeted 13 gene-disease associations, each already assessed by meta-analyses, including at least 15 non-Chinese studies. We searched the Chinese Journal Full-Text Database for additional Chinese studies on the same topics. We identified 161 Chinese studies on 12 of these gene-disease associations; only 20 were -indexed (seven English full-text). Many studies (14–35 per topic) were available for six topics, covering diseases common in China. With one exception, the first Chinese study appeared with a time lag (2–21 y) after the first non-Chinese study on the topic. Chinese studies showed statistically-significantly more prominent genetic effects than non-Chinese studies, and 48% were statistically-significant per se, despite their smaller sample size (median sample size 146 versus 268, p < 0.001). The largest genetic effects were often seen in PubMed-indexed Chinese studies (65% per se). Non-Chinese studies of Asian-descent populations (27% statistically-significant per se) also tended to show somewhat more prominent genetic effects than studies of non-Asian descent (17% statistically-significant per se).

    Conclusion: Our data provide evidence for the interplay of selective reporting and language biases in human genome epidemiology. These biases may not be limited to the Chinese literature and point to the need for a global, transparent, comprehensive outlook in molecular and epidemiologic studies in general.

  60. https://online.wsj.com/article/SB10001424053111904800304576472034085730262.html

  61. http://www.sciencemag.org/content/329/5996/1128

  62. http://www.chinadaily.com.cn/opinion/2011-09/17/content_13725092.htm

  63. http://www.businessweek.com/magazine/content/09_24/b4135000953288.htm

  64. http://www.iapsych.com/iqmr/fe/LinkedDocuments/howard2001.pdf

  65. http://blog.givewell.org/2012/03/01/philanthropys-success-stories/

  66. http://blog.givewell.org/2011/06/11/why-we-should-expect-good-giving-to-be-hard/

  67. http://data.worldbank.org/indicator/SH.XPD.PUBL.ZS

  68. https://www.amazon.com/History-Science-Technology-Discoveries-Inventions/dp/0618221239/

  69. https://www.amazon.com/Crisis-Our-Social-Cultural-Outlook/dp/B000TGUMW6/

  70. https://www.amazon.com/Reptiles-Conscience-Coevolution-Religious-Doctrine/dp/0956881157/

  71. 2004-wicherts.pdf

  72. ⁠, Richard Hamming (1986-03-07):

    [Transcript of a talk by mathematician and manager about what he had learned about computers and how to do effective research (republished in expanded form as Art of Doing Science and Engineering: Learning to Learn; 1995 video). It is one of the most famous and most-quoted such discussions ever.]

    At a seminar in the Bell Communications Research Colloquia Series, Dr. Richard W. Hamming, a Professor at the Naval Postgraduate School in Monterey, California and a retired Bell Labs scientist, gave a very interesting and stimulating talk, ‘You and Your Research’ to an overflow audience of some 200 Bellcore staff members and visitors at the Morris Research and Engineering Center on March 7, 1986. This talk centered on Hamming’s observations and research on the question “Why do so few scientists make substantial contributions and so many are forgotten in the long run?” From his more than 40 years of experience, 30 of which were at Bell Laboratories, he has made a number of direct observations, asked very pointed questions of scientists about what, how, and why they did things, studied the lives of great scientists and great contributions, and has done introspection and studied theories of creativity. The talk is about what he has learned in terms of the properties of the individual scientists, their abilities, traits, working habits, attitudes, and philosophy.

  73. Iodine

  74. http://citeseerx.ist.psu.edu/viewdoc/download?doi=10.1.1.455.8079&rep=rep1&type=pdf

  75. http://gatorlog.com/handout/Stroebe.pdf

  76. http://www.econ.vt.edu/seminars/seminarpapers/2005/weinberg_100705_cc.pdf

  77. http://www.resources.emartin.net/blog/docs/AgeAchievement.pdf