docs/silk-road/2013-power (Link Bibliography)

“docs/​silk-road/​2013-power” links:

  1. https://www.amazon.com/Drugs-2-0-Revolution-Thats-Changing-ebook/dp/B00BLCAD4O

  2. http://mikepower.pressfolios.com/

  3. Silk-Road

  4. Silk-Road#lsd-case-study

  5. https://www.amazon.com/Ketamine-Dreams-Realities-Karl-Jansen/dp/0966001974

  6. https://www.maps.org/books/K-DreamsKJansenMAPS.pdf

  7. ⁠, Nicolas Christin (2012-07-31):

    We perform a comprehensive measurement analysis of Silk Road, an anonymous, international online marketplace that operates as a Tor hidden service and uses as its exchange currency. We gather and analyze data over eight months between the end of 2011 and 2012, including daily crawls of the marketplace for nearly six months in 2012. We obtain a detailed picture of the type of goods being sold on Silk Road, and of the revenues made both by sellers and Silk Road operators. Through examining over 24,400 separate items sold on the site, we show that Silk Road is overwhelmingly used as a market for controlled substances and narcotics, and that most items sold are available for less than three weeks. The majority of sellers disappears within roughly three months of their arrival, but a core of 112 sellers has been present throughout our measurement interval. We evaluate the total revenue made by all sellers, from public listings, to slightly over USD 1.2 million per month; this corresponds to about USD 92,000 per month in commissions for the Silk Road operators. We further show that the marketplace has been operating steadily, with daily sales and number of sellers overall increasing over our measurement interval. We discuss economic and policy implications of our analysis and results, including ethical considerations for future research in this area.

  8. https://www.cylab.cmu.edu/

  9. ⁠, Nicolas Christin (2013-05-13):

    We perform a comprehensive measurement analysis of Silk Road, an anonymous, international online marketplace that operates as a Tor hidden service and uses Bitcoin as its exchange currency. We gather and analyze data over eight months between the end of 2011 and 2012, including daily crawls of the marketplace for nearly six months in 2012. We obtain a detailed picture of the type of goods sold on Silk Road, and of the revenues made both by sellers and Silk Road operators.

    Through examining over 24,400 separate items sold on the site, we show that Silk Road is overwhelmingly used as a market for controlled substances and narcotics, and that most items sold are available for less than three weeks. The majority of sellers disappears within roughly three months of their arrival, but a core of 112 sellers has been present throughout our measurement interval. We evaluate the total revenue made by all sellers, from public listings, to slightly over USD 1.2 million per month; this corresponds to about USD 92,000 per month in commissions for the Silk Road operators. We further show that the marketplace has been operating steadily, with daily sales and number of sellers overall increasing over our measurement interval.

    We discuss economic and policy implications of our analysis and results, including ethical considerations for future research in this area.

    [Keywords: online crime, anonymity, electronic commerce]

  10. 2013-11-29-canadianpostalworker.mht

  11. https://www.torproject.org/

  12. http://wiki.lewman.is/

  13. 2013-10-14-nyt-runasandvik-silkroad1icelandhosting.html

  14. http://www.syverson.org/

  15. http://www.freehaven.net/~arma/cv.html

  16. http://www.wangafu.net/~nickm/

  17. https://www.nytimes.com/2005/06/12/opinion/12rich.html?pagewanted=all

  18. http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b006mg74/features/royalmail

  19. https://www.noisebridge.net/wiki/Noisebridge_Tor

  20. https://en.bitcoin.it/wiki/Genesis_block

  21. 2011-davis#chancellor-on-brink-of-second-bailout-for-banks

  22. Bitcoin-is-Worse-is-Better

  23. http://www.wired.com/magazine/2011/11/mf_bitcoin/all/1

  24. ⁠, Fergal Reid, Martin Harrigan (2011-07-22):

    Anonymity in Bitcoin, a peer-to-peer electronic currency system, is a complicated issue. Within the system, users are identified by public-keys only. An attacker wishing to de-anonymize its users will attempt to construct the one-to-many mapping between users and public-keys and associate information external to the system with the users. Bitcoin tries to prevent this attack by storing the mapping of a user to his or her public-keys on that user’s node only and by allowing each user to generate as many public-keys as required. In this chapter we consider the topological structure of two networks derived from Bitcoin’s public transaction history. We show that the two networks have a non-trivial topological structure, provide complementary views of the Bitcoin system and have implications for anonymity. We combine these structures with external information and techniques such as context discovery and flow analysis to investigate an alleged theft of Bitcoins, which, at the time of the theft, had a market value of approximately half a million U.S. dollars.

  25. http://anonymity-in-bitcoin.blogspot.co.uk/2011/07/bitcoin-is-not-anonymous.html

  26. https://en.bitcoin.it/wiki/Mixing_service

  27. DNM-arrests

  28. https://en.bitcoin.it/wiki/Bitcoin_Fog

  29. http://coinapult.com/

  30. https://en.bitcoin.it/wiki/SatoshiDice

  31. http://www.philzimmermann.com/EN/essays/WhyIWrotePGP.html

  32. http://www.theregister.co.uk/2009/11/24/ripa_jfl/page4.html

  33. http://www.wired.com/images_blogs/threatlevel/2012/04/WILLEMSIndictment-FILED.045.pdf

  34. http://www.igolder.com/

  35. http://www.pecunix.com/

  36. https://www.justice.gov/archive/usao/cac/Pressroom/2012/045.html

  37. 2011-davis